Year 6, Day 40: You May Be Right, I May Be Crazy, But This Album Might Just Be the One You’re Looking For

Year 6, Day 40: Bill Joel – Glass Houses

Track Listing

  1. You May Be Right
  2. Sometimes a Fantasy
  3. Don’t Ask Me Why
  4. It’s Still Rock and Roll to Me
  5. All For Leyna
  6. I Don’t Want to Be Alone
  7. Sleeping With the Television On
  8. C’était Toi (You Were the One)
  9. Close to the Borderline
  10. Through the Long Night

About the Album

Glass Houses is the seventh studio album from singer-songwriter Billy Joel. The album was released on March 12th 1980 through Columbia Records. Single It’s Still Rock and Roll to Me peaked at number one the Billboard Hot 100. The album peaked at number one on the Billboard 200. It is also the 41st best selling album of the 1980’s with well over 7.1 million copies sold in the United States alone. The album is certified 7x platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America.

Thoughts on the Album

So here we are, day number 40, the final day of the project. It’s bittersweet, but unfortunately, the show must come to an end for this year. But don’t you worry nor cry, as we will be back again next year with a whole nother 40 albums in 40 days. I fee like there are artists in everybody’s music have. What I mean by this is, that you can like very specific genres, but there are certain artists that you still listen to outside that/those genres. I feel like those artists for example are Hall & OatesBruce Springsteen, and today’s artist, Billy Joel. I think it’s because of their ability to craft a masterful song that appeals to just about everyone. That’s what Billy Joel did with his 1980 effort, Glass Houses, an all around solid and excellent album that is every top heavy in trying to shed its balladeer image.

Glass Houses is arguably Billy Joel’s most rock oriented album he’s released, and as such, he focused on following my favorite formula for everything in life: K.I.S.S. or “Keep It Simple, Stupid”. Only utilizing five musicians for his band, Joel keeps it simple and tight, forming a cohesive sound. What gives this album a hard edge than his previous releases, is that the electric guitar and keys share equal amount of stage time on each of the tracks. However, the problem with this album isn’t that it tries to hard to be a rocker, is that it’s so incredibly top heavy, it nearly sinks the second half of the album. The first five tracks are all hits, but after that, the question marks arise.

The album opens with the breaking of glass and the hard rocking intro of You May Be Right. Joel busts out the harder edge vocals that are backed up by both saxophone and guitar. Sometimes A Fantasy, is another strong vocal performance. Then there is It’s Still Rock and Roll to Me, one of his biggest hits, skyrocketing up to number one on the Billboard Hot 100, marking his first number one hit. It’s one of his most memorable songs in his repertoire almost 50 years later. While not as strong as the first four tracks, All For Leyna, is a track that has me fascinated and captivated by it, as it stuck with me throughout listening to the album. A strange and dark song about an obsession with a one night stand. Then there’s Closer to the Borderline, which marks Joel’s first foray into the hard rock genre, though it’s not quite successful. Finally there is the album closer, Through the Long Night, a incredibly (and beautifully) well constructed track that makes excellent use of the harmonies.

Conclusion

I’ll freely admit, Glass Houses isn’t Billy Joel‘s best or greatest album. But what it is, is one of the few defining albums of the new wave/post punk movement. Glass Houses is an album that tries a bit too hard to shed Billy Joel‘s balladeer image. However, the entire first half of the album are some of the most recognizable and most memorable of The Piano Man’s repertoire. And while most people will just listen to one of the many of greatest hits albums, Glass Houses is most deservedly worthy of listen and a place in your music library. Tracks like You May Be Right and It’s Rock and Roll to Me still receive airplay on classic rock and variety music radio stations all around the United States. Glass Houses is an essential album for both getting into Billy Joel and following along on his career.

(Previous Post)

Advertisements

Year 6, Day 38: The Godfathers of Punk Rock and Blitzkrieg Bop

Year 6, Day 38: Ramones – Ramones

Track Listing

  1. Blitzkrieg Bop
  2. Beat on the Brat
  3. Judy is a Punk
  4. I Wanna Be Your Boyfriend
  5. Chain Saw
  6. Now I Wanna Sniff Some Glue
  7. I Don’t Wanna Go Down to the Basement
  8. Loudmouth
  9. Havana Affair
  10. Listen to My Heart
  11. 53rd & 3rd
  12. Let’s Dance
  13. I Don’t Wanna Walk Around With You
  14. Today Your Love, Tomorrow The World

About the Album

Ramones is the self-titled debut album from American punk band, Ramones. The album was released on April 23rd 1976 through Sire Records. The album peaked at number 111 on the Billboard 200. The album has been certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America.

Thoughts on the Album

One of my first forays into the punk genre was through the Ramones‘ Blitzkrieg Bop. It’s fast paced and punchy riffs mesmerized me. I was instantly hooked. Now then, the Ramones are the forefathers or godfathers of New York punk, and probably the genre as a whole. The ay this album was produced is pretty unique and that’s what makes it interesting. It’s the way that the music comes from the left and right channels that makes it unique, interesting, and enjoyable. Here’s the thing, the songwriting and song structure is simplistic at best and does get repetitive after awhile, but there is absolute magic in this album.

The album opens with the three chord assault of the lead single and most recognizable Ramones‘ song, Blitzkrieg Bop. Even after Blitzkrieg Bop, the three chord assault and the rapid speed and tempo doesn’t let up until the final track hits 0:00 remaining. The guitars roar with overbearing power and at the same time crafting infectious and easy to play chord progressions that any idiot (or novice guitar player) could play. The drums fiercely fight to keep pace. Joey Ramone croons in an almost British accent. Anyway, I would make the argument that Blitzkrieg Bop was the first true punk sound ever recorded. It’s simple and fast I-IV-V chord progression begins the aural assault with the rest of the band roaring in and then it happens. Suddenly, everyone but the drums drops out and soon you hear the four most recognizable words in punk rock, shouted by Joey…

Hey, ho! Let’s Go!

What the Ramones were all about were speed, hooks, stupidity, and simplicity. An example of the stupidity is found on Beat on the Brat. the line…

Beat on the Brat, Beat on the Brat, Beat on the Brat with a Baseball Bat!

Never fails to make me laugh, despite it being a song about teenage violence. Blunt humor. Judy is a Punk follows in a similar vein albeit showing off some surf rock roots. I Wanna Be Your Boyfriend is an excellent punk rock love song featuring some arpeggiated chords; Listen to My Heart is a similar, yet weaker song. What stands out with Listen to My Heart is the excellent bridge/chorus. On the flip side, I Don’t Wanna Walk Around With You might be the best anti-love song.

Conclusion

Sometimes an album doesn’t have to be commercially successful for it to have a lasting impact. That’s what the Ramones self-titled album is. It was a commercial failure, and yet it’s one of the seminal albums of punk rock and rock music in general. You would think with 14 songs, the album would be well over an hour long. Nope. With most songs clocking in at 2:30 (on average), it’s barely 45 minutes long. What made this album one of the quintessential albums in rock history is it’s ability to blend together fast paced punk with surf rock, girl group pop, and early rock and roll. The Ramones boiled it down to the essentials… and in the end, that’s all you need.

(Previous Post)

Year 6, Day 37: Bayside Thought They Looked Like Strong Hands

Year 6, Day 37: Bayside – Bayside

Track Listing

  1. Hello Shitty
  2. Devotion and Desire
  3. Tortures of the Damned
  4. They Looked Like Strong Hands
  5. Montauk
  6. Blame It on Bad Luck
  7. We’ll Be OK
  8. Existing in a Crisis (Evelyn)
  9. Don’t Call Me Peanut
  10. Half a Life
  11. Dear Tragedy

About the Album

Bayside is the self-titled second studio album from New York based pop punk band, Bayside. The album was released on August 23rd 2005 through Victory Records.

Thoughts on the Album

Down to the final few albums left for this year. I remember hearing Bayside‘s Devotion and Desire  on the EA Sports game MVP 06: NCAA BaseballEA Sports went with the Victory Records label to reflect the change from professional to collegiate baseball, thanks to a their loss of the third party publishing rights to Major League Baseball video games. Anyway, Devotion and Desire was one of my favorite songs off that soundtrack. One of the things about New York, where Bayside is from, is that it is an incredibly fertile ground for musical talent. Bayside sounds like they were assembled in either a secret government lab or factory somewhere with parts from other bands like Brand NewAlkaline Trio, and Taking Back Sunday.

The album opens with the short and quick, Hello Shitty. As the shortest song on the album, there is no need for more. It’s sharp, punchy, and to the point. This pace leads right into the lead single and the aforementioned, Devotion and DesireDevotion and Desire is the strongest track on the album, highlighted by excellent musicianship and instrumental work. Both the guitar and drum work on this song and throughout the album are excellent. The track, Tortures of the Damned features some of frontman Anthony Raneri‘s best and most eloquent lyricism.

If only I had an axe, I’d sever the ties I’ve made with this world

The track Don’t Call Me Peanut, is one of the band’s finest acoustic ballads. And while it’s more the band’s trademarked brand of fast-paced, in-your-face, riff-induced pop punk that skyrocketed them into the spotlight, it doesn’t take a whole lotta heart to appreciate the emotion found on Don’t Call Me Peanut. On the other side, Montauk wins the “best riffage” award, plus it features some of the best use of vocal distortion. Then there’s They Looked Like Strong Hands, a song that slows down the tempo and momentum a bit. It’s slower, less aggressive, but still brings the heat. It’s soaring 6/8 time chorus is where it succeeds. Blame It on Bad Luck starts off in a similar fashion, though with a marching snare drum beat. The slow beat gives way a bluesy verse and chorus that is rather upbeat.

Conclusion

Like most pop punk albums, there is a dip mid album and the first half is way stronger than the second. But Bayside‘s self-titled opus is an incredibly strong one. It’s also a rather refreshing take on the emo-punk/emo-pop genre where there’s no screaming just for the sake of screaming. Bayside, lyrically, is incredibly strong. It’s an album that shines like a diamond amidst a sea of landmines.

(Previous Post)

Year 6, Day 36: Ten Thousand Fists in the Air Tonight.

Year 6, Day 36: Disturbed – Ten Thousand Fists

Track List

  1. Ten Thousand Fists
  2. Just Stop
  3. Guarded
  4. Deify
  5. Stricken
  6. I’m Alive
  7. Sons of Plunder
  8. Overburdened
  9. Decadence
  10. Forgiven
  11. Land of Confusion (Genesis cover)
  12. Sacred Lie
  13. Pain Redefined
  14. Avarice

About the Album

Ten Thousand Fists is the second studio album from American heavy metal band, Disturbed. The album released on September 20th 2005 through Reprise Records. The album peaked at number on the Billboard 200 and is certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America.

Thoughts on the Album

There is power in numbers. Strength en masse. It has to be something to be a member of a band or a musical artists and see thousands upon thousands of people all united, fists in the air, rocking out to your stuff. That’s Disturbed‘s brand of heavy metal/nu-metal. It’s designed to unite everyone and exhilarate the masses. One of the first songs I heard by Disturbed was Ten Thousand Fists. I heard while play Madden 06 and I immediately thought… “I need to hear to more.” I bought the album, much to my old man’s chagrin. He’s not a huge fan of metal, unless it’s the 1980’s hair metal stylings.

You can say what you want about about Disturbed but you can not deny that Ten Thousand Fists is a great but uneven album. What the album does have is frontman David Draiman‘s best vocal work. He seamlessly and flawless blends together his screaming and singing as to not get too annoying and detract from the rest of the music. Songs like the titular track highlight his singing as well as tracks like Deify, Sacred Lie, and Forgiven. Take Deify, a political metal anthem that highlighted the band’s thoughts on then President George W. Bush and the Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. This also noted on in Sacred Lie as well. If there was a message to seen/heard from this album, it’s that the band is trying to make a positive impact and change in the country as well as explaining their viewpoints on the wars in lyrical and poetic format.

Single, Stricken, was a massive hit and highlights some of the band’s best work. There is good reason for why this song was a massive hit. The chorus of the song shows off Draiman‘s harsh, but clean, and powerful vocal prowess. The main riff is instantly recognizable as well as a riff that is extremely fun to learn how to play. The guitars and vocals seemingly play of each other, perfectly harmonizing with each other. That’s a sign of an amazing song: when guitars and vocals can harmonize together. The vocals, guitar, and bass give off an epic vibe to them. Then there’s Overburdened, a six-plus minute, slow burning exploration of progressive metal. It’s one of the band’s best songs, blending together both clean and “dirty” guitar riffs and that menacing bass work/ It all comes to a head with the massive and excellent climax in the outro.

Then there is of course, my favorite track from the album, the album opener and title track, Ten Thousand Fists. A track that takes some electronic elements and uses them at the beginning to make it feel like you are sitting on a battlefield, waiting for the two armies to charge at each other. The track is a complete and total audible adrenaline rush. If you were to put the movie Die Hard into a song, this would the product. A total dynamo of a track that is fueled by pure, raw, unadulterated energy. The drums pound away with earthquaking ferocity. The crunchy and punchy guitar riffs and bass lines send out sonic shockwaves. Draiman’s vocals are awesome here.

Conclusion

While the filler in this album hurts it just a bit, some of the band’s best work is featured here. Ten Thousand FistsDeifyForgiven, Land of Confusion, and Stricken are absolute gems. Frontman David Draiman is at his best with his harsh and clean vocals powering the album. So grab your brothers-in-arms (or sisters-in-arms)  and raises your fists, as Ten Thousand Fists will give you the adrenaline, exhilaration, and unity you need. One last thing:

If this disturbs you, then walk away

(Previous Post)

Year 6, Day 35: Eating Some Chop Suey! with System of a Down

Year 6, Day 35: System of a Down – Toxicity

Track Listing

  1. Prison Song
  2. Needles
  3. Deer Dance
  4. Jet Pilot
  5. X
  6. Chop Suey!
  7. Bounce
  8. Forest
  9. ATWA
  10. Science
  11. Shimmy
  12. Toxicity
  13. Psycho
  14. Aerials

About the Album

Toxicity is the second studio album from Armenian-American metal band, System of a Down. The album was released on September 4th 2001 through Columbia RecordsToxicity peaked at number one on the Billboard 200 and is certified 3x platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America. All of the singles from Toxicity charted on the Billboard Hot 100, with Aerials peaking at number one on the Mainstream Rock Songs and Modern Rock Tracks.

Thoughts on the Album

So here we are, the final week of the project… let’s finish off loud and proud. 2001 was a weird time for me when it came to music. My musical taste was all over the place ranging from Top 40 to hard rock and everything in behind. Then came along System of a Down with Toxicity and blew the pants of middle school me. The intensity and volume was incredibly different from anything I had heard before and it left me wanting every more. Two songs from this album have stuck with me: Chop Suey! and AerialsToxicity did something that most albums don’t/can’t/fail to do: it made people who absolutely hate the metal genre listen to this album. Toxicity itself became a cultural phenomenon that not even mainstream FM radio with their self-imposed attempt at self-censoring nor September 11th could stop.

While it all starts with the album opener, with this album it starts with the sixth track, Chop Suey! Chop Suey! was and still is a genre defining song. It’s a track so potent that even with its not-so-discreet lyrics about suicide could stop it from receiving massive airplay on the airwaves. It’s a track with such massive success and power, it reminds me of Faith No More‘s smash hit, Epic. It’s brutal verses with damn near gibberish lyrics and hushed whispers about suicide are instantly recognizable from first listen. The piano filled choruses and outro are equal parts beautiful, stunning, and haunting. I could keep going on and on about this masterpiece, but I will sum up my thoughts about like this: It manages to be emotional, raw, and controversial all at once.

The album’s opener, Prison Song is one of the best/strongest album openers I’ve ever heard. If we are talking like they are starting pitchers in baseball, this one is Roy Halladay caliber. With it’s false starts and silence sparsed heavy introduction showcases a defining moment in music post Y2K. It’s bridge should come off as preachy, but somehow fits into the song. A strong song that is completely addictive and a great opener. The titular track Toxicity, is another strong track that takes shots the material culture and self-centered/self-absorption. Buoyed by fantastic guitar work, Toxicity features a sudden and abrupt shift in melodies which makes it incredibly enjoyable to listen to. Aerials closes out the album with authority. A classic that is also buoyed by fantastic guitar work and probably over-poetic lyrics. These two combine to create a sense of overall significance to signal the album’s close.

Conclusion

System of a Down’s Toxicity heralded in a new era of rock music. It was equal parts unique, powerful, and orchestral to a point. Anchored by massive hits like Chop Suey! and Aerials, it was an album that received a metric shit ton (actual scientific measurement) of airplay… even from people who hated or didn’t like the genre. The album mixes it’s instrumentation together to create a classic. Not quite a masterpiece of an album thanks to songs like X, Psycho, and Jet PilotToxicity ranks right near the top for the best album of the previous decade. A truly invigorating album that is an incredible adventure from start to finish.

(Previous Post)

Year 6, Day 34: Taking a Victory Lap with Propagandhi

Year 6, Day 34: Propagandhi – Victory Lap

Track Listing

  1. Victory Lap
  2. Comply/Resist
  3. Cop Just Out of Frame
  4. When All Your Fears Collide
  5. Letters to a Young Anus
  6. Lower Order (A Good Laugh)
  7. Failed Imagineer
  8. Call Before You Dig
  9. Nigredo
  10. In Flagrante Delicito
  11. Tartuffle
  12. Adventures in Zoochosis

About the Album

Victory Lap is the seventh studio album from Canadian punk band, Propagandhi. The album was released on September 29th 2017 through Epitaph Records.

Thoughts on the Album

I am pretty sure that with today’s album, we have reached peak Canadian for the duration of the project. Three (I think) Canadian bands in one calendar week. Propagandhi is today’s featured artist with their seventh studio effort, Victory Lap, which is their first album released in five years. Leave it to a bunch of Canadians to write and produce a set of incredibly socially and politically conscious songs. Here’s the thing with Victory Lap… it takes the melodic hardcore punk that Propagandhi is known for and somehow turns it into metal. Not sure what kind of sorcery they used to make it work, but it’s incredibly good. Punk at it’s most base and primal form is raw, powerful, and rebellious. With the addition of the metal elements (found with guitars, not on the periodic table), Victory Lap breathes life into a genre that’s been kicking around for the last four-plus decades or so.

Propagandhi has always been a cut above the rest in the genre. Maybe it’s because they’re Canadian… I don’t know. Propagandhi is band that when they release an album, they have something to say. It’s giving a savage message that is delivered with such raging energy that this genre is sorely missing at the moment… especially given the global climate. Victory Lap comes at you with both intelligence and honesty. It’s thirty six and a half minutes of guitar riffs that thrash about like sea waves in a typhoon. While there really isn’t any diversion from what’s already been done and the differences here are minute, where it lacks in innovation, it makes up in incredible songwriting. It’s the blistering guitar riffs and breakneck speed of Comply/Resist and the melancholic breather of Nigredo.

What Victory Lap does best and strongest is that it has excellent and incredible control over a wide range of moods and emotions that the album an exceedingly engaging one from start to finish. The musicianship is amazing and dynamic ranging from the grooving gymnastics of the bass to the powerful and earthquaking drums to the blistering guitar riffs and fantastic solos. The instrumentals on this album offer up countless stellar and powerful moments that showcases the band at their peak, even after 31 years in the game. What this album does is offer up Propagandhi at their purest form, albeit with some tapping into some past elements. Comply/Resist is a sharp-edged, propulsive, and explosive tune that’ll make the hairs on the back of your neck stand at attention. The same goes for When Your Fears Collide. Tracks like Letters to a Young Anus and Failed Imagineer offer up more hardcore punk rager moments and shows off just versatile and well-schooled this band is.

Conclusion

While Victory Lap is a slightly weighty album that leans on the bands more playful side which occasionally detracts from the lyrics. That’s really my only gripe about this album. It’s the best punk album from 2017, hands down. The vocals are delivered with a sense of unyielding conviction that are still hungry for more. An unyielding conviction that is set on melting your face. The music backing the vocals is damn near flawless and delivered with almost the same conviction and incredibly high standard. Half-Metallica, half-Black Flag (or Dead Kennedys, if you prefer), Propagandhi‘s Victory Lap is punk at it’s best and highest standards. And while Propagandhi might not be able to save the world by their lonesome selves, Victory Lap serves as their call to arm to join the fray and fight back. And yeah sure, it’s alright if you take some breaks to slam dance.

(Previous Post)

Year 6, Day 33: Happiness… Is Definitely NOT a Fish You Can Catch

Year 6, Day 33: Our Lady Peace – Happiness… Is Not a Fish You Can Catch

Track Listing

  1. One Man Army
  2. Happiness & The Fish
  3. Potato Girl
  4. Blister
  5. Is Anybody Home?
  6. Waited
  7. Thief
  8. Lying Awake
  9. Annie
  10. Consequence of Laughing
  11. Stealing Babies

About the Album

Happiness… Is Not a Fish You Can Catch (or from here on out, Happiness…) is the third studio album album from Canadian alternative rockers, Our Lady Peace. The album was recorded January 1999 through June 1999 and released on September 21st 1999 through Columbia Records. The album debuted at number one on the Canadian Albums Charts and is certified 3x platinum by the Canadian Recording Industry Association.

Thoughts on the Album

Let’s finish this week out, weird. Did you know that happiness isn’t a fish you can catch? If you didn’t, well now you know. I remember back in high school (2005-2008) looking at this kid’s backpack and he had either written on it in white fabric paint or a pin that read “OUR LADY PEACE”. I was trying figure out what it meant. So using the dial up internet and after three hours of searching the internet, I discovered that they were a rock band from Canada. So figured to check them out. Flash forward to present day and two of the albums that have stuck with me have been their second album, Clumsy and today’s album, and their third, Happiness… Is Not a Fish You Can Catch.

I don’t know why these two albums have stuck with me since high school. Maybe it’s the pure ambition and grandeur that these albums have. But anyway onto Happiness…. II’m to make the argument that Happiness… is flat out Our Lady Peace‘s best album they’ve produced. Having some of the band’s more memorable cuts like One Man Army and Stealing BabiesHappiness… also combines the many different styles of their first two albums. The band does an amazing job of effectively incorporating the song writing and musical depth that was Naveed with the catchy hooks and accessibility of Clumsy into an album that is fun, interesting album that is a piece of quintessential 1990’s alternative rock. However, this is not Our Lady Peace just resting on their laurels. Nope, not by a long shot. This album builds off of previous successes. It’s an album that sounds, fresh, new, and exciting all at the same time, which is something other bands in the genre can’t say they achieved this feat.

The true showcase of Happiness… is vocalist Raine Maida. His vocals take front and center stage and are excellent. In a genre were you need powerful vocals, Maida has them. The music is energetic and lively and at some points, emotional. I will say about Maida’s vocals is that, they are at their most bizarre (seriously give Annie or Consequence of Laughing a listen, and you’ll find out just what I mean). His vocals, however bizarre at points on the album are exceedingly enjoyable to listen to. The lyrics and song writing are just as ambiguous and metaphorical as previous releases. It’s 43 minutes of Our Lady Peace is at their best as they wave their magic wand through infectious, anthemic choruses; with soft, vocal driven verses; as well as acoustic intros that are absolutely chilling and rhythm sections that the entirety of the band makes contributions to.

The album opener, One Man Army, is a mid-tempo rocker and an incredibly upbeat cut. It has arguably the best and most effective chorus on the album with Maida’s vocals seemingly stealing the spotlight. However, the driving bass lines, guitar riffs, and keys add much needed depth around Maida’s vocals. The follow up track, Happiness & The Fish, takes it in an entirely different direction (and atmosphere). While One Man Army is more upbeat, Happiness & The Fish is more serious. Albeit, Happiness & The Fish maintains that frantic edge that it’s predecessor has, the lyrical content is a complete 180. Here the lyrical content rather than musical ability is on full display. The second single, Is Anybody Home?, is a incredibly song that starts of with muted vocals before Maida explodes onto the scene with a driving bass groove, pounding drums, and an incredibly talk box melody that burrows into your head and stays there. Then it drops right off into the chorus with subdued guitars and vocals.

The album is closed out by the tracks, Consequences of Laughing and Stealing Babies in fantastically strong fashion. Consequences of Laughing features bass lines and guitar riffs that grow during the verses were Raida’s vocals shine. It’s here on Consequence of Laughing where Maida goes into the strangest falsetto I’ve ever heard. Stealing Babies is the strongest track on the album, in humblest of opinions. It’s tense and angsty atmosphere that builds up into this soft and jazzy interlude that just explodes into a chaotic mess of heavy distortion guitar riffs, keys, bass lines, and drums.

Conlcusion

I’m upset… Happiness is not a fish you can catch

Happiness… Is Not a Fish You Can Catch is an incredibly strong (and somehow peak Canadian) album. Blending together what made their two previous albums work best with more infectious hooks and accessibility, Our Lady Peace is at top form. While every track seems to follow a formula, they all manage to sound fresh and new; though some tracks are weaker than other tracks. Frontman Raine Maida‘s unique and memorable falsetto is so much fun and enjoyable to listen to. Happiness… is one of the better cuts of 1990’s alternative rock.

(Previous Post)