Year 6, Day 39: I’m Leaving on a Mayday

Year 6, Day 39: Anna Ternheim – Leaving on a Mayday

Track List

  1. What Have I Done
  2. Damaged Ones
  3. Terrified
  4. Let it Rain
  5. My Heart Still Beats For You
  6. No, I Don’t Remember
  7. Make It On My Own
  8. Summer Rain
  9. Losing You
  10. Off the Road
  11. Black Sunday Afternoon

About the Album

Leaving on a Mayday is the fourth studio album from Swedish singer-songwriter Anna Ternheim. The album was released on August 11th 2008 through Verve Forecast Records, a subsidiary of Verve Records.

Thoughts on the Album

Down to our final two albums of the year. For today’s album, I decided contrast was needed. This whole project has featured some loud and in-your-face albums that bring both the noise and energy.For today, that’s showcase some contrast by going lighter. I’ve stated many times before on this project how much I love female singers and female fronted rock bands. You can sense the energy, poeticness, and power they bring to the today, often times overlooked. This one of the reasons why I love Anna Ternheim. The Swedish singer-songwriter’s voice is equally calming and powerful. That’s why for today’s album, we’re gonna crank the volume down slightly and chill out to the pretty sweet sounds of Leaving on a Mayday.

Leaving on a Mayday is one of the albums I listen to when I need to chill out/calm down or when I’m feeling I need a pick me up. And let me tell you something, generally, I like to read the lyrics or liner notes in the album jacket, but with this album, I started to but stopped. I wanted to enjoy were the lyrics and sounds would take me. One thing that stands out the most is just how pristine and clear Ternheim’s voice truly is. Her vocals are so crystal clear and direct that she leaves zero room for any lyrical misinterpretation. Her pristine and clear vocals make enough space for the absolute gorgeous string arrangements and mesmerizing percussion. The album itself is incredibly consistent and refined and highlights/showcases just how criminally underrated Terheim is as vocalist and a songwriter.

This album is an incredibly open one; one that’ll take a listen or two to reveal it’s true hidden beauty. This openness is rather inventive too. Rather than reduce the sound or the number of instruments. it is achieved through creating a sparseness and spaciousness with the sound. This inventive sparseness actually seems to create a bigger and more richer sound. But if you pay attention the lyrics, you will find that even the most joyous moments are shot through with the trademarked Swedish sense of melancholy. Here’s the thing, after so many listens of this album, Terheim herself might as well be singing in her native Swedish. While every word is easily discernible, it’s almost as if Terheim’s voice became a whole nother instrument. This shows just how much of an incredibly perfect fit her vocals are with the song arrangements.

The track Let it Rain highlights the strength, both in her lyrics, vocals, and melodies. So much so that it seemingly invokes a primal feeling to it. Of course, you give me an excellent bass line, and I’m a happy dude. That’s where a track like the album opener, What Have I Done. It’s a funky bass line that is slightly uptempo; an excellent pick for the opener. Then there is my personal favorite, No, I Don’t Remember… an incredibly gloomy and gorgeous track. However it’s tracks like What Have I DoneLosing You, and No, I Don’t Remember that shone the brightest. Ternheim is really able to keep her power and essence with these tracks, especially with the uptempo What Have I Done and Losing You.

Conclusion

Anna Ternheim created a gem with Leaving on a Mayday. It’s an incredibly gloomy, haunting, powerful, and yet somehow upbeat album. Ternheim did something that many singer-songwriters and even other rock and rollers can’t do: write catchy and infectious songs without gimmicks. The album flows incredibly smooth like the ebb and flow of the tide. And when the final song is over, it’s as if Ternheim took you on a musical journey with her.

(Previous Post)

Advertisements

Year 6, Day 37: Bayside Thought They Looked Like Strong Hands

Year 6, Day 37: Bayside – Bayside

Track Listing

  1. Hello Shitty
  2. Devotion and Desire
  3. Tortures of the Damned
  4. They Looked Like Strong Hands
  5. Montauk
  6. Blame It on Bad Luck
  7. We’ll Be OK
  8. Existing in a Crisis (Evelyn)
  9. Don’t Call Me Peanut
  10. Half a Life
  11. Dear Tragedy

About the Album

Bayside is the self-titled second studio album from New York based pop punk band, Bayside. The album was released on August 23rd 2005 through Victory Records.

Thoughts on the Album

Down to the final few albums left for this year. I remember hearing Bayside‘s Devotion and Desire  on the EA Sports game MVP 06: NCAA BaseballEA Sports went with the Victory Records label to reflect the change from professional to collegiate baseball, thanks to a their loss of the third party publishing rights to Major League Baseball video games. Anyway, Devotion and Desire was one of my favorite songs off that soundtrack. One of the things about New York, where Bayside is from, is that it is an incredibly fertile ground for musical talent. Bayside sounds like they were assembled in either a secret government lab or factory somewhere with parts from other bands like Brand NewAlkaline Trio, and Taking Back Sunday.

The album opens with the short and quick, Hello Shitty. As the shortest song on the album, there is no need for more. It’s sharp, punchy, and to the point. This pace leads right into the lead single and the aforementioned, Devotion and DesireDevotion and Desire is the strongest track on the album, highlighted by excellent musicianship and instrumental work. Both the guitar and drum work on this song and throughout the album are excellent. The track, Tortures of the Damned features some of frontman Anthony Raneri‘s best and most eloquent lyricism.

If only I had an axe, I’d sever the ties I’ve made with this world

The track Don’t Call Me Peanut, is one of the band’s finest acoustic ballads. And while it’s more the band’s trademarked brand of fast-paced, in-your-face, riff-induced pop punk that skyrocketed them into the spotlight, it doesn’t take a whole lotta heart to appreciate the emotion found on Don’t Call Me Peanut. On the other side, Montauk wins the “best riffage” award, plus it features some of the best use of vocal distortion. Then there’s They Looked Like Strong Hands, a song that slows down the tempo and momentum a bit. It’s slower, less aggressive, but still brings the heat. It’s soaring 6/8 time chorus is where it succeeds. Blame It on Bad Luck starts off in a similar fashion, though with a marching snare drum beat. The slow beat gives way a bluesy verse and chorus that is rather upbeat.

Conclusion

Like most pop punk albums, there is a dip mid album and the first half is way stronger than the second. But Bayside‘s self-titled opus is an incredibly strong one. It’s also a rather refreshing take on the emo-punk/emo-pop genre where there’s no screaming just for the sake of screaming. Bayside, lyrically, is incredibly strong. It’s an album that shines like a diamond amidst a sea of landmines.

(Previous Post)

Year 6, Day 35: Eating Some Chop Suey! with System of a Down

Year 6, Day 35: System of a Down – Toxicity

Track Listing

  1. Prison Song
  2. Needles
  3. Deer Dance
  4. Jet Pilot
  5. X
  6. Chop Suey!
  7. Bounce
  8. Forest
  9. ATWA
  10. Science
  11. Shimmy
  12. Toxicity
  13. Psycho
  14. Aerials

About the Album

Toxicity is the second studio album from Armenian-American metal band, System of a Down. The album was released on September 4th 2001 through Columbia RecordsToxicity peaked at number one on the Billboard 200 and is certified 3x platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America. All of the singles from Toxicity charted on the Billboard Hot 100, with Aerials peaking at number one on the Mainstream Rock Songs and Modern Rock Tracks.

Thoughts on the Album

So here we are, the final week of the project… let’s finish off loud and proud. 2001 was a weird time for me when it came to music. My musical taste was all over the place ranging from Top 40 to hard rock and everything in behind. Then came along System of a Down with Toxicity and blew the pants of middle school me. The intensity and volume was incredibly different from anything I had heard before and it left me wanting every more. Two songs from this album have stuck with me: Chop Suey! and AerialsToxicity did something that most albums don’t/can’t/fail to do: it made people who absolutely hate the metal genre listen to this album. Toxicity itself became a cultural phenomenon that not even mainstream FM radio with their self-imposed attempt at self-censoring nor September 11th could stop.

While it all starts with the album opener, with this album it starts with the sixth track, Chop Suey! Chop Suey! was and still is a genre defining song. It’s a track so potent that even with its not-so-discreet lyrics about suicide could stop it from receiving massive airplay on the airwaves. It’s a track with such massive success and power, it reminds me of Faith No More‘s smash hit, Epic. It’s brutal verses with damn near gibberish lyrics and hushed whispers about suicide are instantly recognizable from first listen. The piano filled choruses and outro are equal parts beautiful, stunning, and haunting. I could keep going on and on about this masterpiece, but I will sum up my thoughts about like this: It manages to be emotional, raw, and controversial all at once.

The album’s opener, Prison Song is one of the best/strongest album openers I’ve ever heard. If we are talking like they are starting pitchers in baseball, this one is Roy Halladay caliber. With it’s false starts and silence sparsed heavy introduction showcases a defining moment in music post Y2K. It’s bridge should come off as preachy, but somehow fits into the song. A strong song that is completely addictive and a great opener. The titular track Toxicity, is another strong track that takes shots the material culture and self-centered/self-absorption. Buoyed by fantastic guitar work, Toxicity features a sudden and abrupt shift in melodies which makes it incredibly enjoyable to listen to. Aerials closes out the album with authority. A classic that is also buoyed by fantastic guitar work and probably over-poetic lyrics. These two combine to create a sense of overall significance to signal the album’s close.

Conclusion

System of a Down’s Toxicity heralded in a new era of rock music. It was equal parts unique, powerful, and orchestral to a point. Anchored by massive hits like Chop Suey! and Aerials, it was an album that received a metric shit ton (actual scientific measurement) of airplay… even from people who hated or didn’t like the genre. The album mixes it’s instrumentation together to create a classic. Not quite a masterpiece of an album thanks to songs like X, Psycho, and Jet PilotToxicity ranks right near the top for the best album of the previous decade. A truly invigorating album that is an incredible adventure from start to finish.

(Previous Post)

Year 6, Day 34: Taking a Victory Lap with Propagandhi

Year 6, Day 34: Propagandhi – Victory Lap

Track Listing

  1. Victory Lap
  2. Comply/Resist
  3. Cop Just Out of Frame
  4. When All Your Fears Collide
  5. Letters to a Young Anus
  6. Lower Order (A Good Laugh)
  7. Failed Imagineer
  8. Call Before You Dig
  9. Nigredo
  10. In Flagrante Delicito
  11. Tartuffle
  12. Adventures in Zoochosis

About the Album

Victory Lap is the seventh studio album from Canadian punk band, Propagandhi. The album was released on September 29th 2017 through Epitaph Records.

Thoughts on the Album

I am pretty sure that with today’s album, we have reached peak Canadian for the duration of the project. Three (I think) Canadian bands in one calendar week. Propagandhi is today’s featured artist with their seventh studio effort, Victory Lap, which is their first album released in five years. Leave it to a bunch of Canadians to write and produce a set of incredibly socially and politically conscious songs. Here’s the thing with Victory Lap… it takes the melodic hardcore punk that Propagandhi is known for and somehow turns it into metal. Not sure what kind of sorcery they used to make it work, but it’s incredibly good. Punk at it’s most base and primal form is raw, powerful, and rebellious. With the addition of the metal elements (found with guitars, not on the periodic table), Victory Lap breathes life into a genre that’s been kicking around for the last four-plus decades or so.

Propagandhi has always been a cut above the rest in the genre. Maybe it’s because they’re Canadian… I don’t know. Propagandhi is band that when they release an album, they have something to say. It’s giving a savage message that is delivered with such raging energy that this genre is sorely missing at the moment… especially given the global climate. Victory Lap comes at you with both intelligence and honesty. It’s thirty six and a half minutes of guitar riffs that thrash about like sea waves in a typhoon. While there really isn’t any diversion from what’s already been done and the differences here are minute, where it lacks in innovation, it makes up in incredible songwriting. It’s the blistering guitar riffs and breakneck speed of Comply/Resist and the melancholic breather of Nigredo.

What Victory Lap does best and strongest is that it has excellent and incredible control over a wide range of moods and emotions that the album an exceedingly engaging one from start to finish. The musicianship is amazing and dynamic ranging from the grooving gymnastics of the bass to the powerful and earthquaking drums to the blistering guitar riffs and fantastic solos. The instrumentals on this album offer up countless stellar and powerful moments that showcases the band at their peak, even after 31 years in the game. What this album does is offer up Propagandhi at their purest form, albeit with some tapping into some past elements. Comply/Resist is a sharp-edged, propulsive, and explosive tune that’ll make the hairs on the back of your neck stand at attention. The same goes for When Your Fears Collide. Tracks like Letters to a Young Anus and Failed Imagineer offer up more hardcore punk rager moments and shows off just versatile and well-schooled this band is.

Conclusion

While Victory Lap is a slightly weighty album that leans on the bands more playful side which occasionally detracts from the lyrics. That’s really my only gripe about this album. It’s the best punk album from 2017, hands down. The vocals are delivered with a sense of unyielding conviction that are still hungry for more. An unyielding conviction that is set on melting your face. The music backing the vocals is damn near flawless and delivered with almost the same conviction and incredibly high standard. Half-Metallica, half-Black Flag (or Dead Kennedys, if you prefer), Propagandhi‘s Victory Lap is punk at it’s best and highest standards. And while Propagandhi might not be able to save the world by their lonesome selves, Victory Lap serves as their call to arm to join the fray and fight back. And yeah sure, it’s alright if you take some breaks to slam dance.

(Previous Post)

Year 6, Day 33: Happiness… Is Definitely NOT a Fish You Can Catch

Year 6, Day 33: Our Lady Peace – Happiness… Is Not a Fish You Can Catch

Track Listing

  1. One Man Army
  2. Happiness & The Fish
  3. Potato Girl
  4. Blister
  5. Is Anybody Home?
  6. Waited
  7. Thief
  8. Lying Awake
  9. Annie
  10. Consequence of Laughing
  11. Stealing Babies

About the Album

Happiness… Is Not a Fish You Can Catch (or from here on out, Happiness…) is the third studio album album from Canadian alternative rockers, Our Lady Peace. The album was recorded January 1999 through June 1999 and released on September 21st 1999 through Columbia Records. The album debuted at number one on the Canadian Albums Charts and is certified 3x platinum by the Canadian Recording Industry Association.

Thoughts on the Album

Let’s finish this week out, weird. Did you know that happiness isn’t a fish you can catch? If you didn’t, well now you know. I remember back in high school (2005-2008) looking at this kid’s backpack and he had either written on it in white fabric paint or a pin that read “OUR LADY PEACE”. I was trying figure out what it meant. So using the dial up internet and after three hours of searching the internet, I discovered that they were a rock band from Canada. So figured to check them out. Flash forward to present day and two of the albums that have stuck with me have been their second album, Clumsy and today’s album, and their third, Happiness… Is Not a Fish You Can Catch.

I don’t know why these two albums have stuck with me since high school. Maybe it’s the pure ambition and grandeur that these albums have. But anyway onto Happiness…. II’m to make the argument that Happiness… is flat out Our Lady Peace‘s best album they’ve produced. Having some of the band’s more memorable cuts like One Man Army and Stealing BabiesHappiness… also combines the many different styles of their first two albums. The band does an amazing job of effectively incorporating the song writing and musical depth that was Naveed with the catchy hooks and accessibility of Clumsy into an album that is fun, interesting album that is a piece of quintessential 1990’s alternative rock. However, this is not Our Lady Peace just resting on their laurels. Nope, not by a long shot. This album builds off of previous successes. It’s an album that sounds, fresh, new, and exciting all at the same time, which is something other bands in the genre can’t say they achieved this feat.

The true showcase of Happiness… is vocalist Raine Maida. His vocals take front and center stage and are excellent. In a genre were you need powerful vocals, Maida has them. The music is energetic and lively and at some points, emotional. I will say about Maida’s vocals is that, they are at their most bizarre (seriously give Annie or Consequence of Laughing a listen, and you’ll find out just what I mean). His vocals, however bizarre at points on the album are exceedingly enjoyable to listen to. The lyrics and song writing are just as ambiguous and metaphorical as previous releases. It’s 43 minutes of Our Lady Peace is at their best as they wave their magic wand through infectious, anthemic choruses; with soft, vocal driven verses; as well as acoustic intros that are absolutely chilling and rhythm sections that the entirety of the band makes contributions to.

The album opener, One Man Army, is a mid-tempo rocker and an incredibly upbeat cut. It has arguably the best and most effective chorus on the album with Maida’s vocals seemingly stealing the spotlight. However, the driving bass lines, guitar riffs, and keys add much needed depth around Maida’s vocals. The follow up track, Happiness & The Fish, takes it in an entirely different direction (and atmosphere). While One Man Army is more upbeat, Happiness & The Fish is more serious. Albeit, Happiness & The Fish maintains that frantic edge that it’s predecessor has, the lyrical content is a complete 180. Here the lyrical content rather than musical ability is on full display. The second single, Is Anybody Home?, is a incredibly song that starts of with muted vocals before Maida explodes onto the scene with a driving bass groove, pounding drums, and an incredibly talk box melody that burrows into your head and stays there. Then it drops right off into the chorus with subdued guitars and vocals.

The album is closed out by the tracks, Consequences of Laughing and Stealing Babies in fantastically strong fashion. Consequences of Laughing features bass lines and guitar riffs that grow during the verses were Raida’s vocals shine. It’s here on Consequence of Laughing where Maida goes into the strangest falsetto I’ve ever heard. Stealing Babies is the strongest track on the album, in humblest of opinions. It’s tense and angsty atmosphere that builds up into this soft and jazzy interlude that just explodes into a chaotic mess of heavy distortion guitar riffs, keys, bass lines, and drums.

Conlcusion

I’m upset… Happiness is not a fish you can catch

Happiness… Is Not a Fish You Can Catch is an incredibly strong (and somehow peak Canadian) album. Blending together what made their two previous albums work best with more infectious hooks and accessibility, Our Lady Peace is at top form. While every track seems to follow a formula, they all manage to sound fresh and new; though some tracks are weaker than other tracks. Frontman Raine Maida‘s unique and memorable falsetto is so much fun and enjoyable to listen to. Happiness… is one of the better cuts of 1990’s alternative rock.

(Previous Post)

Year 6, Day 32: Linkin Park’s Empowering Debut… “Hybrid Theory”

Year 6, Day 32: Linkin Park – Hybrid Theory

Track List

  1. Papercut
  2. One Step Closer
  3. With You
  4. Points of Authority
  5. Crawling
  6. Runaway
  7. By Myself
  8. In the End
  9. A Place For My Head
  10. Forgotten
  11. Cure for the Itch
  12. Pushing Me Away

About the Album

Hybrid Theory is the debut album from American rock band, Linkin Park. The album was recorded from March 2000 through July 2000 and released on October 24th 2000 through Warner Brother Records. The album peaked at number two on the Billboard 200 and is certified diamond by the Recording Industry Association of America with well over 11+ million albums sold in the United States of America alone. The album is ranked number eleven in Billboard‘s Top 200 albums of the decade (2000-2009). Single In the End peaked at number two on the Billboard Hot 100, number 1 on Billboard‘s Top Alternative Songs (Modern Rock), and number three on Billboard‘s Top Mainstream Rock Songs.

Thoughts on the Album

Man, it comes back to me… in the end. And in the end, it doesn’t even matter. Every once in a while, there comes a band or an album that changes and challenges the perceptions of a music genre.Now then, whether or not that band or album is original depends, but however, there are always bands that produce the same exact ideas that never make the mainstream. Now then, for a #ThrowbackThursday (#TBT), let us travel back in time to 2000. It’s the new millennium (technically a.k.a. mathematically speaking the year 2000 wasn’t, but let’s just go along with it) and the radio airwaves are a mess. Dominated by grunge, alternative rock, bubblegum/boy band pop, and rap, the airwaves are crowded. The clock had struck midnight and it was time for something new. Enter Linkin Park and the debut album Hybrid Theory.

Hybrid Theory blurred the lines of many genres, but no more than rap and rock, taking rock elements like guitars and drums and fusing them with a DJ and electronic beats. What we got was an album that landed at the right place and right time in music history and skyrocketed off the charts in meteoric fashion. The album itself is not just one of the top selling debut albums of all time, but top selling albums of the last decade (2000-2009). It was one of the first albums I ever owned and one the first albums my dad called “noise pollution”. One of the biggest things about Linkin Park is just how accessible they really are, steering away from most profanity. The single One Step Closer drove the band into the mainstream, showing off it’s metal chops with that unmistakable and unforgettable guitar riff in the introduction of the song. Then, the rap/hip hop elements enter help build the song into a climax where the band jams out as if it was just a regular rock band. The verses have an ebb-and-flow to them, building up then coming back down after the chorus. It’s the late Chester Bennington‘s screams that highlight the explosive chorus. A perfect song to choose as the lead single, showing off catchy guitar riffs and the clear screams of Bennington.

However, it is because of one song that this album had such a launch. The fourth single, In the End. It’s a slower tempo tune, but man oh man, is it awesome. That haunting piano introduction sets the tone with some sparse electronic elements mixed in for some flair before Bennington sings out…

It starts with one…

Mike Shinoda enters with rapping verses as electronic drum beats keep pace. But it’s the chorus where the song comes back into the rock realm when the live drums and power chords enter. That chorus though. It’s one of the best choruses I’ve ever heard. It’s one that I love to sing along to. It’s so damn infectious that I don’t even think a vaccine could prevent it from infecting you. It’s a track whose strength is being able to switch back and forth between the two realms of hip hop/rap and rock and roll.

Quick hits: Crawling is a hell of a song. Not on the same scale as One Step Closer or In the End, it still hit home. I’m one of those people that gets emotionally invested in the music I listen to. The instrumentals are strong and sharp and Bennington‘s vocals take the main stage. Papercut is the album opener and shows off the nu-metal, rap-metal, rap rock right off the band combining the guitar riffs with electronic elements. Here, Shinoda takes front and center on vocals with Bennington harmonizing.

Conclusion

Hybrid Theory is an atmospheric and ethereal album that is one of the greatest albums of the last decade. Hell, even most music critics and experts agree with that. But what Linkin Park did with Hybrid Theory, was they created an album that kids and teenagers could resonate with. An album that empowered an entire generation of pre-teens and teenagers. It’s an album that allowed kids and teens to know that what they are/were feeling, was okay. It allowed those kids and teens who were alienated to take solace in the creams and heavy power chords. And that my friends, may be the answer to why this album did so excellently and continues to do so.

(Previous Post)

Year 6, Day 31: Going Heavy on the Killer, Light on the Filler with Sum 41

Year 6, Day 31: Sum 41 – All Killer No Filler

Track Listing

  1. Introduction to Destruction
  2. Nothing on My Back
  3. Never Wake Up
  4. Fat Lip
  5. Rhythms
  6. Motivation
  7. In Too Deep
  8. Summer
  9. Handle This
  10. Crazy Amanda Bunkface
  11. All She’s Got
  12. Heart Attack
  13. Pain for Pleasure

About the Album

All Killer No Filler is the debut studio album from Canadian pop punk band, Sum 41. The album was recorded from September 2000 through March 2001 and released on May 8th 2001 through Island Records. The album peaked at number thirteen on the Billboard 200 and lead single Fat Lip peaked at number one on the Billboard Modern Rock Chart as well as number sixty six on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. Single In Too Deep peaked at number ten on the Billboard Modern Rock Chart as well. The album is certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America.

Thoughts on the Album

Pop punk is one of the few genres were it’s okay to not be revolutionary or progressive, which I can safely say that Sum 41 is not. Pop punk is genre where playing it safe works about 96.3% of the time. So what makes today’s album from Sum 41, All Killer No Filler so special? Outside of being uniquely Canadian, it’s another pop punk album that defined genre, band, and year. What makes All Killer No Filler special and a cut about the rest, is that Sum 41 created an album that has sound and competent songwriting and instrumental talent. That’s where it separates itself from the rest of the genre. This album represents a maturing band, albeit musically. There’s nothing wrong with playful or sophomoric humor in your songs.

The strong point of this album is that it is incredibly fun to listen to… and when combined with the instrumental performance on the album, makes it even stronger. Right off the bat, the guitar work is phenomenal. You can hear the influence that heavy metal had on this band, but it’s just strong enough to not over power their core style. However, Pain for Pleasure eschews this as an ode to glam metal. A welcome addition for those who might have been getting weary of their previous work.

All Killer No Filler does have things that are rather atypical for a pop punk album… mainly guitar solos and certain riffs. Most guitar solos are uncommon for pop punk and are not standard, factory-issued. In Too Deep has an excellent tapping solo. The solo and the opening riff of In Too Deep are unforgettable and instantly recognizable. This song is the cream of the crop when it comes to the guitar work on the album. What the album also does best if counteracting the weaker tracks with what are now considered to be pop punk classics (Fat LipIn Too Deep). Fat Lip, the lead single, was a massive hit that brought the band into the spotlight. A catchy introduction combined with pseudo-rapping verses that have unforgettable lyrics and an anthemic chorus, you have a classic seemingly genre defining song. This is the song that comes to mind when you think of pop punk.

Conclusion

All Killer No Filler is what comes to mind when you think of pop punk. With it’s atypical and nonstandard guitar riffs and solo, this album was one of the best of 2001. Fat Lip and In Too Deep both received massive airplay on the radio. Backed by infectious hooks and catchy melodic riffs, Sum 41 goes heavy on the killer and light on filler with All Killer No FillerIt’s an album that any casual fan of the pop punk genre can get into.

(Previous Post)