Year 5, Day 17: Asking, “What’s Your Favorite Hall and Oates Song?”

Year 5, Day 17: Hall & Oates – Daryl Hall & John Oates

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Track list

  1. Camellia
  2. Sara Smile
  3. Alone Too Long
  4. Out of Me, Out of You
  5. Nothing at All
  6. Gino (The Manager)
  7. (You Know) It Doesn’t Matter Anymore
  8. Ennui on the Mountain
  9. Grounds for Separation
  10. Soldering

About the Album

Daryl Hall & John Oates is the self-titled fourth studio from Philadelphia blue-eye soul rockers, Hall and Oates. It is referred to as The Silver Album. The album was released in 1975 through RCA Records.

Thoughts on the Album

Everyone has a favorite Hall and Oates song, even if you don’t like Hall and Oates. For me, my favorite is would have to be Fall in Philadelphia. It is a perfect transition to talk about today’s album, Daryl Hall and John OatesHall and Oates are a Philadelphia staple in the Philadelphia music scene and have been since the 1970s. What the move to RCA Records in 1975 allowed the duo to experiment with production styles and sound and get the style and sound that worked best for them. The end result is album referred to as The Silver Albumtheir self-titled fourth album.

The production on the album is excellent. It’s crisp and sharp and shimmers with a pop sheen that makes most of the songs shine. While tracks like Ennui on the Mountain and Soldering don’t really appeal to me, the rest of the tracks are lush and catchy. Most of the tracks are ballads and midtempo rockers that are just as appealing as Sara Smile, their breakthrough and number one hit.

The album itself is a remarkably consistent one. While I felt like Ennui on the Mountain and Soldering faltered a bit, they really aren’t duds per se. Sara Smile turned out to be the duo’s breakthrough hit. Though Camellia and Alone Too Long deserved to be hits as well.

Conclusion

Short and sweet today. Before you make judgments, listen. Yes, Sara Smile is on the record and say what you want about the album cover, but what about the content? Daryl Hall & John Oates marks a return to that Philly blue-eye soul, but mixed some more rock and pop. A great album but far from the duo’s best.

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